Tod in die tropische Erde: “por favor no me dejen morir”. Noticias desde un limbo tropical

Bamboo, dry palms, coconuts, leaves, newspapers, books, photograph, stuffed
animals, seeds, hat, maracas, drum, necklaces, objects, jute, parrots.
Museo de Arte Contemporáneo del Zulia. Maracaibo, Venezuela

refugio3MarcoMontiel-Soto

ENES

The corresponding relationship between myth and reality, between what we imagine and what actually exists, or between “paradise” and “hell”, are some of the aspects that have been evoked since colonial times referring to the tropics and the Caribbean lands. The tropic has represented a place for wild nature, exuberance and unequalled richness of resources, as it has been the scenery for projected fantasies and sociopolitical utopias that have in great measure defined the identities of countries located in the region.

However, the tropics are “the kingdom of paradox” as affirmed by Alfons Hug [1], when he refers to the contradictions that are present in a region where, despite it being one of the richest in resources and diversity in the world, poverty and social inequality still predominate.

This exhibition looks into the many representations of the Caribbean and how they relate to the contemporary local predicaments. In this occasion, the artist Marco Montiel Soto presents two of his works in the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo del Zulia – Maczul. For one, Tod in die Tropische Erde: “Por favor no me dejen morir”: Noticias desde un limbo tropical is a specific piece for which the exhibition is named after, it is an installation gathering different works and objects. And, on the other hand, the intervention The Caribbean dream is another utopia is also presented in the central patio of the museum. These two works establish a relationship between different aspects of ideologies inherited from both the Age of Enlightenment and the scientific german Romanticism of the XIX century, with the contradictions and paradoxes of the social and political state of affairs that permeates the press nowadays.

entrada9

hola lorito2MarcoMontiel-Soto

refugio16MarcoMontiel-Soto

refugio4MarcoMontiel-Soto

refugio25MarcoMontiel-Soto

An analysis of the wording Tod in die Tropische Erde reveals the semantic game on which the greater load of Montiel-Soto’s body of work is based. In this particular case, he appropriates a term commonly used by Alexander von Humboldt in his scientific texts when describing the tropics as a sublime, paradisiacal place, where all sorts of plants, animals and climactic events can take place. Ahead of the term Tropische Erde (tropical earth) Montiel-Soto places the word “Tod” (death) to question the caribbean imaginary that has prevailed well into the present.

Death in the tropical earth evokes the perfect title for a crime novel of the first half of the XX century, a literary style in which the stories would take place in old british or french colonies in Africa or Asia. These novels would narrate adventures lead by characters born into the high class, and developed in the midst of luxury, diplomacy and wealth. In many cases, the titles for these publications was the result of the combination of a word suggesting a tragic incident and a geographical reference evoking an exotic place. Death in the Nile or Murder in the Orient Express, for example.  

With the frase Tod in die Tropische Erde, the reference is made in relation to an imaginary of great contrast between a land of exuberance and luxury, at the same time inevitably related to tragic events. Montiel-Soto insists in the loss of charm of the tropics for being linked to death by violence, culture, money, power, corruption, drugs or a simple reckoning.

“Por favor no me dejen morir” or “Please don’t leave me to die” is also a part of the exhibition title, a frase that stems from one of the myths of the death of now ex-president Hugo Chávez. According to local press, he had told this to the Chief of the Presidential Guard while on his death bed. With this quote, Montiel-Soto clearly directs his attention to the questioning of the sociopolitical reality of Venezuela, immerse in a ‘tense calm’ where deep divisions have become more visible in the realms of public opinion and society. Specially between those who support the current political leaders and those who contradict them, between those who point to the increase of corruption, drug trafficking, violence and those who don’t believe it.

With this frase, the tragedy that is currently developing in the caribbean country is accentuated. The reference to a social tragedy debates the crystallization of political projects of great magnitude, such as the Bolivarian movement, 200 years after Bolívar’s contribution to Venezuelan history.

The installation that is presented in the main room refers to an engraving that portrays Alexander von Humboldt and Aimé Bonpland inside a “explorer’s shelter” filled with samples collected during their travels along the Orinoco river in the early years of the XIX century.

In this case, the shelter is crammed with dry palm leaves from the museum’s own Chaguaramo trees, bamboos, aloe vera, coconuts, plants and “taparas” (natural pots from the fruit of the Taparo tree) that were collected in various locations and in the Botanical Garden, as well as taxidermies, a desk and instruments for scientific measuring.

In addition to the reference of elements of scientific iconography of the XIX century, Montiel-Soto inserts new elements into this environment: a video of moving “maracas” (musical instrument of indigenous origins), a series of photomontages, photographic material, a painting pierced by a machete and a lightbulb that turns on with a car’s battery. The shelter presents itself as an open archive of tropical significance, where different historical documents are displayed next to aesthetic objects open to free interpretation.

vitrina en el refugioMarcoMontiel-Soto

vitrina en el refugio10MarcoMontiel-Soto

acuario6MarcoMontiel-Soto

jaula tortuga caimanMarcoMontiel-Soto

arma primitivaMarcoMontiel-Soto

The photomontages included in the installation accentuate the semantic play on words previously mentioned. The graphic material that serves as a base for these photomontages are several prints arranged in series on Latin American fauna, taken from different encyclopedic publications that came to be via Sunday newspapers or sold in kiosks around Venezuela, during the seventies and eighties. Collaged over these print sheets are different newspaper clippings from the venezuelan press referring to the common issues that concern the public opinion, such as the scarcity of products in supermarkets or the violence and insecurity that abounds country-wide.

The press headlines are dissected, as one would botanical or animal samples, to insert them in a collection where news would acquire a different value, be it scientific or aesthetic. As Montiel-Soto states: “in taking the news out of the context of the newspaper, it’s not really news any more, although if it is, […] with the narrative being switched to be accompanied by pictures of animals, it seems as though the headlines are poetry […]”

With these collages, the veracity and objectivity of two separate stories are confronted and they do not correspond to each other, which inserts a certain oddity in perception. In other words, the natural order described by a zoology encyclopedia, as Montiel-Soto uses, is broken when it is superposed to the chaos of a journalistic feature. The exotic has no place where the everyday is filled with absurdity. These photomontages recover the dramatic dimension of the news which is no less striking even when absorbing this new poetic façade.

The central patio exhibition, The Caribbean dream is another utopia, is an installation of a series of hammocks hung to the palm trees that live in the museum garden. Except the hammocks are hung in a great height where they can’t be reached, just observed from a distance. Meanwhile, in one of the access points to the interior rooms, a dialog can be overheard between two living parrots that are also present.

As described by Montiel-Soto himself, the impossible height of the hammocks and the fact that one cannot rest on them is alluding to a utopia, an unattainable wish, in his own words:“the people are invited to the museum to relax in a hammock-clad shelter, the visitor is lied to […] once again Venezuelans encounter a situation where their dreams are frustrated, unapproachable”.

Dos indios en la laguna de MaracayboMarcoMontiel-Soto

acuario1MarcoMontiel-Soto

Muerte en la tierra tropical azul6MarcoMontiel-Soto

balanza de cocosMarcoMontiel-Soto

The question arises: what utopia is Caribbean Dream referring to? How was the Caribbean imaginary built surrounding a hammock, coconut water and some palm trees? The hammock, a symbol of rest and pleasure, works as a vehicle to deepen the meaning of a more complex territory where the ideas of relaxation and freedom coexist with social inequality and violence.

Montiel-Soto gives us some clues regarding this paradise through a historical postcard portraying a woman laying comfortably on a hammock that dates back to the end of the XIX century. An idillic scene that becomes disorienting when we notice that her rest is due to the work force of a slave. An object so common as a hammock acquires a historical dimension and is present as the crossroad where different ideologies collide.

The Caribbean dream is another utopia deals with the visibility of a meta-narrative. Surely, the caribbean dream is charged with the “romantic” point of view of the german scientists who wrote about american landscapes as “native and exuberant” places similar to paradise. Parallel to this, was the fantasy of liberation and revolution that resulted in yearnings of independence and, fast enough, entire anti-imperialistic movements of the early XIX century under the heat of the Cuban revolution.

Thus, through this exhibition, Montiel-Soto winks onto matters of art and politics, in the sense that he promotes a critical reading into the Venezuelan present tense through irony and dark humour. It’s no coincidence, for example, that the photomontage material comes from serial encyclopedias distributed by the press in a time of extreme abundance and financial liquidity. That glorious past is contrasted with the current predicament of the national press, where paper is a scarce commodity, resulting in what appears and looks much like censorship of the press.

Noticias desde un limbo tropical makes social and political contradictions visible. Such common contrasts of the everyday that they are seemingly part of a new sense of normalcy. They are understood, they have sunk in and are now part of the narrative, apparently coherent until it is all put into evidence, emphasizing the absurdity and tragedy that the Venezuelan collective imaginary faces.

[1] Hug, A. (2009). “Was sind die Tropen?”. En Kunstforum InternationalEd. 195. Enero – Marzo. TZ-Verlag, Rossdorf Pág. 44 – 47.

Oscar Ardila, 2015

Muerte en la tierra tropicalMarcoMontiel-Soto

La correspondencia entre mito y realidad, entre lo que es imaginado y lo que existe realmente, o entre lo “paradisiaco” y lo “infernal” son algunos aspectos que se evocan desde los tiempos coloniales en relación al trópico o al Caribe. El trópico ha representado el lugar de una naturaleza salvaje, de lo exuberante, de una riqueza de recursos inigualable y ha sido el escenario donde se proyectaron fantasías y utopías sociopolíticas que han definido en gran medida las identidades de los países ubicados en esta región.

No obstante el trópico es un “reino de paradojas” como lo afirma Alfons Hug [1] cuando se refiere a las contradicciones presentes en una región que, a pesar de ser uno de los lugares más ricos en recursos y diversos del mundo, es también uno de los más pobres y con mayores desigualdades sociales.

Esta muestra indaga en torno a cuales son esas representaciones del Caribe y como se relacionan con problemáticas locales contemporáneas. En esta ocasión, el artista Marco Montiel-Soto presenta dos trabajos en el Museo de Arte Contemporáneo del Zulia – Maczul.

Por una parte, Tod in die Tropische Erde: “Por favor no me dejen morir”: Noticias desde un limbo tropical es una obra que le da el nombre general a la muestra. Se trata de una instalación que reúne distintos trabajos y objetos en la salsa base. Por otra parte se presenta la intervención The Caribbean dream is another utopia en el patio central del museo. Estos dos trabajos ponen en relación aspectos de las ideologías heredadas del proyecto de la Ilustración y del proyecto científico del romanticismo alemán del siglo XIX con las contradicciones y paradojas de la situación social y política evidente en la prensa venezolana reciente.

entrada9

hola lorito2MarcoMontiel-Soto

refugio16MarcoMontiel-Soto

refugio4MarcoMontiel-Soto

refugio25MarcoMontiel-Soto

Un análisis del enunciado Tod in die Tropische Erde revela el juego semántico sobre el que se basa gran parte del trabajo de Montiel-Soto. En este caso, él se apropia de un término utilizado comúnmente por Alexander von Humboldt en sus textos científicos para describir al trópico como un lugar paradisiaco, donde se dan todo tipo de plantas, animales y situaciones climáticas. Al término Tropische Erde (tierra tropical) Montiel-Soto le antepone la palabra “Tod” (muerte) para cuestionar el imaginario del Caribe que ha permanecido hasta nuestros días.

Muerte en la tierra tropical evoca el título perfecto para una novela policiaca de la primera mitad del siglo XX, cuyas historias se desarrollaban en las antiguas colonias británicas y francesas en Asia o África. Estas novelas narraban aventuras protagonizadas por personajes provenientes de clases altas y se desarrollaba en medio del lujo, la riqueza y la diplomacia. En muchos casos el título de estas publicaciones era el resultado de la combinación de una palabra que sugería un hecho dramático con la referencia a un lugar exótico, por ejemplo, Muerte en el Nilo Asesinato en el Orient Express.

Con la frase Tod in die Tropische Erde se señala un imaginario que involucra un contraste entre un lugar de aventura, de exuberancia y lujo desbordado que está vinculado inevitablemente a un hecho trágico. Montiel-Soto insiste en la pérdida del encanto del trópico porque está ligado a la muerte, pero a la muerte por violencia, por cultura, por dinero, por poder, corrupción, drogas o simplemente por un ajuste de cuentas.

“Por favor no me dejen morir” dice también el título de la exposición. Una frase proveniente de uno de los mitos sobre el deceso del ex-presidente Hugo Chávez y que, según la prensa oficial, le habría dicho al jefe de la guardia presidencial en su lecho de muerte. Con esta cita, Montiel-Soto dirige claramente su atención al cuestionamiento de la realidad política y social del país venezolano. Una realidad inmersa en una tensa calma y en la que se han acentuado profundas divisiones en la opinión pública y en la sociedad, entre quienes apoyan o contradicen la política oficial, entre quienes señalan el aumento de la corrupción, del narcotráfico, de los índices de violencia y quienes no lo creen.
Con esta frase se acentúa la tragedia que se desarrolla actualmente en este país del Caribe. La referencia a una tragedia de orden social debate la cristalización de proyectos de orden político y de gran envergadura como puede ser el proyecto bolivariano más de doscientos años después.

La instalación que se presenta en la sala base tiene como referencia a un grabado que retrata a Alexander von Humboldt y Aimé Bonpland al interior de un “refugio de explorador” lleno de las muestras recolectadas durante su viaje a lo largo del río Orinoco a principios del siglo XIX.

En este caso el refugio está abarrotado con hojas de palmeras secas de los chaguaramas del museo, muestras de bamboo, aloe vera, cocos, plantas y taparas, recolectados en distintas locaciones y en el Jardín Botánico, así como animales disecados, un escritorio e instrumentos de medición científica.

Además de la referencia a elementos de la iconografía científica del siglo XIX, Montiel-Soto ha insertado en este ambiente nuevos elementos: el video de unas maracas en movimiento, una serie de fotomontajes, material fotográfico y postales de su archivo personal, una pintura atravesada por un machete y un bombillo que funciona con la batería de auto. El refugio se presenta así como un archivo abierto de los significados del trópico, donde se disponen diferentes documentos históricos y objetos estéticos para una libre interpretación.

vitrina en el refugioMarcoMontiel-Soto

vitrina en el refugio10MarcoMontiel-Soto

acuario6MarcoMontiel-Soto

jaula tortuga caimanMarcoMontiel-Soto

arma primitivaMarcoMontiel-Soto

Los fotomontajes incluidos en la instalación acentúan ese juego semántico al que se refería anteriormente. El material gráfico que sirve de base para estos fotomontajes son láminas de la fauna latinoamericana procedentes de publicaciones enciclopédicas seriadas, que circularon a través del periódico dominical o en kioscos en Venezuela durante los años setentas y ochentas. Sobre estas láminas se añadieron recortes de titulares tomados de la prensa venezolana que aluden a la situación de escasez y a la sensación de inseguridad que circula recientemente en la opinión pública.

Los titulares de prensa son diseccionados, como se haría con muestras botánicas o animales, para insertarlos en una colección donde las noticias tendrían otro valor ya sea científico o estético. Dice Montiel-Soto: “Al sacar la noticia del contexto del periódico pierde su valor noticioso, digamos que ya no es noticia aunque si lo es, […] el texto narrativo de la noticia es intercambiado por imágenes de animales, pareciera que los titulares fueran poesías […]”

Con estos fotomontajes se confrontan la veracidad y objetividad de dos relatos que no se corresponden, lo que inserta cierta extrañeza en la percepción. Dicho de otra forma, la descripción de un orden natural hecho por una enciclopedia de zoología, como la que utiliza Montiel-Soto, se interrumpe cuando se confronta al caos enunciado por una crónica periodística. Lo exótico tiene cabida allí donde lo cotidiano se llena de extrañeza. Los fotomontajes recuperan así la dimensión dramática de las noticias que, aunque poética, no es menos impactante.

Por otra parte, en el patio central del museo se presenta la intervención The Caribbean dream is another utopia, allí se instalaron una serie de hamacas que cuelgan de las palmeras a gran altura y que solamente pueden ser observadas desde la distancia. Mientras tanto, en uno de los puntos de acceso a las salas, se pueden escuchar la grabación del “dialogo” entre unos loros vivos que están en el patio exterior.
Como lo describe el propio Montiel-Soto, la altura de las hamacas y la frustración de no poder descansar en ellas alude a una utopía, a un deseo que resulta inalcanzable, según él: “las personas son invitadas al museo a relajarse en un refugio con hamacas, el visitador del museo es invitado, mentido […] una vez mas el venezolano se encuentra en una situación donde sus sueños son frustrados, son inalcanzables”.

Dos indios en la laguna de MaracayboMarcoMontiel-Soto

acuario1MarcoMontiel-Soto

Muerte en la tierra tropical azul6MarcoMontiel-Soto

balanza de cocosMarcoMontiel-Soto

Cabe preguntarse ¿A qué utopía se refiere exactamente el Caribbean Dream? ¿Cómo se construyó un imaginario del Caribe en torno la hamaca, el agua de coco, las palmeras? La hamaca como símbolo de descanso y placer sirve como vehículo para profundizar en el significado de un territorio más complejo donde, por ejemplo, la noción de descanso y de libertad coexisten con problemáticas como la desigualdad social, la violencia, etc.

Montiel-Soto nos da algunas pistas a partir de una postal histórica que retrata a una mujer que yace cómodamente sobre una hamaca hacia finales del siglo XIX. Una escena idílica que resulta perturbadora cuando se nota que su descanso se basa en la fuerza de trabajo esclava. Un objeto tan corriente como una hamaca adquiere así una dimensión histórica y se presenta como el punto de cruce de distintas ideologías.

The Caribbean dream is another utopia tiene que ver con la visibilidad de un meta-relato. Seguramente el sueño caribeño tiene mucho de la mirada “romántica” de los científicos alemanes quienes, entre otros, se referían a los paisajes americanos como a un lugar “originario y exuberante” similar a la representación del paraíso. Igualmente esta fantasía tiene que ver con el ideal de liberación y revolucionario por cuanto allí se proyectaron los proyectos independentistas de principios del siglo XIX y antiimperialistas de mediados del siglo XX originado bajo el calor de la revolución cubana.

Con esta exposición Montiel-Soto le hace un guiño a cuestiones que se mueven entre el arte y la política, en el sentido en que promueve una lectura crítica de la realidad actual venezolana llena de ironía y muy cercana al humor negro.
No es casualidad que el material de los fotomontajes haya sido el de las enciclopedias seriadas distribuidas por la prensa en los setentas y ochentas, en una época de abundancia petrolera y de liquidez financiera. Ese pasado glorioso se pone en contraste con la situación actual de escasez de papel, una dificultad que debe afrontar la prensa constantemente en lo que parece una especie de censura periodística.
Noticias desde un limbo tropical significa hacer visible contradicciones sociales y políticas. Contradicciones tan comunes, que ocurren de forma tan seguida, que a veces las noticias del periódico son entendidas como algo normal y coherente, pero que ahora se hacen visibles cuando se ponen en evidencia lo absurdo y la dimensión trágica persistentes en el imaginario colectivo venezolano.

[1] Hug, A. (2009). “Was sind die Tropen?”. En Kunstforum InternationalEd. 195. Enero – Marzo. TZ-Verlag, Rossdorf Pág. 44 – 47.

Oscar Ardila, 2015

Muerte en la tierra tropicalMarcoMontiel-Soto